Qualified, Professional Staff at our Liverpool Dentist

You can be assured of professional treatment at our Private Dentist in Liverpool.  All of our Dentists are highly qualified and they take excellent care of your welfare and comfort first and foremost. 

If you are not yet registered with our Private Dentist, you can do so by clicking here and following the register now button.

Dentist from Manchester Eleni Kalamara pleaded guilty to five charges of carrying out dentistry illegally following an investigation and prosecution by regulators the General Dental Council.

A former dentist who treated patients, including children, illegally has been fined.

Happy staff at our Liverpool Dentist

Dentistry divided – NHS dentists substantially more unhappy than private.

The results from the latest NHS Confidence Monitor survey have painted a stark picture of a deep gulf between the happiness levels of NHS dentists compared to private dentists. The former overwhelmingly said they were unhappy in response to every question asked about their working life.

In contrast, the vast majority of those working in private practice said they were happy. And, whilst these results may not be that surprising to anyone who has caught even a glimpse of the headlines about the NHS (both specifically in relation to dentistry and also the wider healthcare system) over recent months, they are still shocking.

Enjoy safe oral health care at our Liverpool Dentist

Former dentist 'treated 1,500 patients while unregistered'

Eleni Kalamara pleaded guilty to five charges of carrying out dentistry illegally following an investigation and prosecution by regulators the General Dental Council.

The General Dental Council believes Kalamara treated 1,502 patients – including 392 children – in total between April 2015 and January 2016 whilst unregistered and without insurance.

A former dentist who treated patients, including children, illegally has been fined.

Eleni Kalamara pleaded guilty to five charges of carrying out dentistry illegally following an investigation and prosecution by regulators the General Dental Council.

UK’s top ‘sweet-tooth’ cities revealed

With the Great British Bake Off back on our television screens, one leading charity has investigated where in the United Kingdom is most likely to reach for a roulade and which places are saying no to a gateau.

The Oral Health Foundation polled thousands of Brits to discover which city's residents give in to their ‘sweet-tooth' the most and reveal the nation's cake eating habits.

Belfast topped the list, with more than four in five (83%) residents consuming portions of cake and biscuits every day. Norwich and Liverpool came next, with nearly three in four (74%) treating themselves daily.1 This may explain why Belfast and Liverpool have some of the highest levels of tooth decay in Britain. 

Oral and Physical health are linked

Tooth-brushing and flossing to maintain healthy gums has been common knowledge for many years, and has played a significant role in improving general oral health. However, evidence is building of links between oral infection and bacteria with conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, respiratory disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Treating inflammation, therefore, may not only help manage periodontal disease, but may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions.

The Easter egg aftermath

Even though Easter is behind us the munching of our Easter eggs may still continue throughout the week.  So it is particularly important to take care of our oral health that this sweet time of year.

Striking a balance between letting your child indulge on their treats and keeping an eye on their consumption is the best way to make sure their oral health doesn't suffer. It is how often, not how much sugary food and drink is consumed that causes oral health problems.

To help, the British Dental Health Foundation is offering the following tips and advice to help make Easter a treat for everyone.

E-Cigs cause damage to gum tissue

A University of Rochester Medical Center study suggests that electronic cigarettes are as equally damaging to gums and teeth as conventional cigarettes.

The study, published in Oncotarget, was led by Irfan Rahman, Ph.D. professor of Environmental Medicine at the UR School of Medicine and Dentistry, and is the first scientific study to address e-cigarettes and their detrimental effect on oral health on cellular and molecular levels.

Electronic cigarettes continue to grow in popularity among younger adults and current and former smokers because they are often perceived as a healthier alternative to conventional cigarettes.

Subscribe to RSS - Liverpool Dentist